Video (games) killed the Radio star

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I couldn’t think of a better title for this post, so that’s what you’ve got.  And it actually might be the truth, since my little brother whose reality is more rooted in video games than anything tangible, has never turned on the radio.  Ever.  Unless of course it’s part of some video game he’s playing.

 

Jonathan Wright Illustrator
Image courtesy Pinnguaq

I’m writing this post because I got some unusual leeway to post some of the concept art I’m working on for a very cool video game from the folks at Pinnguaq.  They’re creating a game based on a few traditional Inuit stories relating to the mythical sea beast, Qalupalik.  What gives it an even neater dimension is that they’re programming it for the Occulus Rift, so that the haunting game play will be all that more immersive.  (If you don’t know about the Occulus Rift, its a brand-spanking new type of gaming, where you wear a goggle headset and you’re immersed in the game completely.  You owe it to yourself to at least google what its all about.)

Now usually for concept art for those of you who don’t know, the artist (in this case me) is contracted to do work under a non-disclosure agreement (NDA), which means that all the work you do cannot be shown by the artist to anyone under any circumstances until the company who hired you allows- which normally means well after the release of the final product (in this case the game).  This is the first time I’ve worked like this, and I like it because now I’m able to show what I’ve been doing.  Sometimes while working on other projects where I have signed a NDA, I really, really want to show people the fun stuff I’m creating but can’t.  And it’s totally understandable that the person commissioning my work would want to keep it under wraps until the final product is released because there really are eyes and ears everywhere, some of whom will gladly take your ideas and call them your own.  To more fully understand the pressures and accountability involved in film and video games, I attended a fantastic workshop last week about just that: producing.  I was blown away that much of a producer’s job is making sure no there’s no copyright infringement is making its way into the project, and that you’re also protected from others taking your intellectual property.  I really don’t know if keeping all the concept work away from the public eye until the unveiling of the product is best, so it’ll be neat to see how Pinnguaq’s approach will work.

And be sure to read this great article by a reporter who attended GDC (the massive game developers conference in San Diego) last week where Pinnguaq unveiled the budding Qalupalik game.  It’s a great article, and congrats to the boys and gals at Pinnguaq for your success!  I look forward to doing more work on the project.

Here’s some of what I’ve done on the project to date, and I hope you like ’em.  All images courtesy Pinnguaq:

 

Jonathan Wright Illustrator
Copyright Pinnguaq 2014
Jonathan Wright Illustrator
Copyright Pinnguaq 2014
Jonathan Wright Illustrator
Copyright Pinnguaq 2014

2 Responses

  1. Suzie Napayok-Short

    I really love these drawings! I’d like to share them on Facebook but there is no app for it so I’ll save images and write Johnathan Wright of course, who also did my story book!

  2. jonwright

    Thanks, Suzie. I had a lot of fun working on your book- it’ll be nice to see it in real life! But I should mention that I don’t own the above images, so if you want to share them, please contact Pinnguaq, or at the very least credit the artwork with their name- they’d appreciate it!

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